My Alpine Home

Friday, January 20, 2017

Give a Cheer for Pom Poms!

What is it about pom poms that makes us want to stand up and give a big cheer?
 
Perhaps they take us back to our younger days as a cheerleader, :) or maybe it's just because they are so darn cute!!


Not only cute, but easy and fun to make.  Especially if you have this handy dandy gadget.

 
$6.99 at Joannes's, but I snagged mine with a 50 percent off coupon.  Sure you can wrap yarn around cardboard, but this (in my opinion) was worth every penny.  Pom poms all turn out the same size and it was easy to use.  That is after my engineer hubby figured it out for me.  lol!  Truth be told!
 
This is the yarn I used.  Both on sale.  I made one pom pom with the red and cream but didn't care how there were longs strips of plain cream.  After that I cut it and wrapped the stripe and the cream separately.



So easy I made them while out of town celebrating my oldest sister's 80th birthday.  Wrap a little eat a little, wrap a little , eat a little more. 

 
I could hardly wait to string them and hang them up.  Sometimes I laugh at myself about how silly I am!  I strung and hung them the night we got home and in the morning I just HAD to decorate my living room mantle.  I won't be pulling out the rest of the Valentines until next week.  But I just couldn't wait!  That kid in a candy store syndrome. lol!
 
 
Using a large needle and crochet thread I strung them leaving space in between.
 


New found love for a simple scrubbing brush.  Loved the red bristles!

 
The marquee letter 'V' came off of a theater in a nearby town.  It remains one of my favorite Valentine d├ęcor items.
 

 
I made the wool blocks quite a few years ago, but they still hold a special place in my heart!


What grandma doesn't love giving hugs and kisses?  The chicken wire crown was a craft I made with my sil a few years ago as well.  I threw in one of my old radios for a touch of aqua.

 
In case your interested, here's how that little gadget works.  You wrap the yarn around the half circles.

 
Then you close it and snip all around the circle.
 
 
This is what it will look like after you have clipped it.  Next cut a small piece of yarn and wrap around the circle twice and tie off.


Carefully pull maker apart and voila!



A perfect (same size every time) pom pom!


You can just tie these to string or whatever with the little pieces left from tying off if you want.  I chose to cut them off and to thread them into a garland with a needle.

Hip, Hip, Hurray!

What can I say?  I love pom poms!

hugs,
Jann

I will be sharing with these fun parties:
Vintage Charm
Monday Social
Valentines Link Party
 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Share Your Cup #232

Hello and welcome to Share Your Cup, (SYC for short).
 
The party where you share what makes you happy.  It's what I call, "filling your cup".
 
I have been so busy the last couple of weeks.  I am helping a friend with her Aunts estate.  She passed away recently and had a home full of treasures.  She lived in a very rural area and her only son lives out of state.  My friend, Dolly asked if I would help her sort and sale for the son.  It is quite a job, but I am definitely getting my junkin fix!  The estate is 2 hrs. away from my home and I have made two trips in which I returned home with my small SUV packed to the brim.  I am having our first sale this Thurs.-Sat.  Hoping it goes well.  If so, I'll be packing up more and hosting another sale in just a couple of weeks.
 
Last week we traveled 4 hours away and spent time with extended family.  We all gathered to celebrate my oldest sister's 80th birthday.
 
I shared a guest post by Merri Cvetan where she showed us a Bathroom Vanity Redo-Craftsman Style
 

Now for the features from SYC #231:
 
 
Carol from Comfort Spring shared the recipe for her yummy Tangerine Yogurt Dream Parfait.
 

 
 
Just Jan Blog shared some of her beautiful tablescapes with flowers from '2016'.
 
 
Carole From My Carolina Home shared her winter whites.
 
 
 
Kathy from Sharing Shadymont shared her goodwill find that she gave a makeover.
 
 
 
Thanks for sharing and please grab my button if you were featured.
 



 

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Vanity Redo: Craftsman Style

Hello my friends,
 
 I have a love for craftsman style.  So when I was asked to share this article by Merri Cvetan, a Wisconsin interior designer I was more than willing!
 
(I did not receive any compensation for sharing)
 
 
Every room should have a focal pointeven your bathroom. The focal point can be an architectural element like a fireplace, or a great piece of furniture like a baby grand or Aunt May’s Chippendale armoire. It can even be the view, if you’re lucky enough to see mountains or a sandy beach. In the bathroom, the vanity is generally the focal point. It’s front and center, supports the sink and fits right under the mirror
 
 
Sometimes, it needs a little facelift. It is possible to update and refresh the bath without major remodeling. Paint and new hardware are obvious solutions, but I Iike to go a step further. It’s easy to not only change the cabinet front, but give it a whole new personality.


 

The craftsman movement in America was an architectural and interior design philosophy from the end of the 19th century through the 1930s. Wood paneling was an important design element of this period. Installing wainscot paneling in the bathroom would be a big project, but I can get the same look just by adding beadboard paneling to the vanity cabinet.


Since this basic, traditional cabinet has a flat panel door, it was easy to cut the wainscot to fit using a table saw. After sanding the edges smooth, I glued it to the door with Liquid Nails, a paneling construction adhesive.
 
 

The next step was to pick paint colors. Olive green was a common color a hundred years ago in a Craftsman home. It’s a cool color that nicely complements the warm wood stain tones from the era. I choose Behr’s "Dried Chive." It has a vintage feel but a fresh look. When painting cabinetry a strong color, I suggest sticking with a warm neutral on the wall. Choose something like Glidden’s "Mushroom Cap" and "Gentle Fawn" as an accent color. (In my next career, I want the job of choosing paint color names!) You can also view some additional vanity style inspiration here.

Finally, for the door pull, I went with a traditional spoon foot pull in bronze with copper highlights. I like the contrast of the dark bronze with green paint.

 
In just a few hours, you can transform a ho-hum bathroom into a fabulous Craftsman-style retreat.

I hope you enjoyed this article by Merri.
 
hugs,
Jann
Merri Cvetan is a Wisconsin interior designer who enjoys incorporating her crafting skills into her decor projects. Merri writes on both design and crafting for Home Depot. If you are planning to try your hand at a DIY bathroom vanity renovation, you can find a wide selection of cabinet materials on Home Depot’s website.

 
 

 


Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Share Your Cup #231

Hello and welcome to Share Your Cup, (SYC for short).
 
The party where you share what makes you happy. 
It's what I call, "filling your cup".
 
Lots of things have been filling my cup this last week.  Hubby and I just finished our first project of '2017'.  Nothing big, but I am loving it!  I'll be sharing it soon.
 
Also, I have been helping a friend with her Aunt's estate.  She passed away recently and had so many treasures.  It's quite an undertaking, but I am definitely getting my 'pickin' fix!  :)
 
Last week I shared A Winter's Tea that I enjoyed on a cold Sunday afternoon.  I curled up under a cozy blanket and sipped
as I watched the BBC documentary The Edwardian Farm.
 
 
I also shared  A Hearty Winter's Meal. This rib sticking recipe of cabbage and potato dumplings was passed down from my Czechoslovakian ancestors.
 
 
I want to thank all of you for continuing to support
Share Your Cup!
 
Now for the features from SYC #230:
 
Christina from Organic Garden Dreams wished us all a 'Happy New Year' and shared these gorgeous white roses picked fresh from her garden.  Oh, to pick roses in January!
 
 
 
Diana from Adirondack Girl at Heart often shares her travels with us.  Oh my how this barn at Sharon Springs made my heart swoon!  May have something to do with the fact that it's red.
 


Must admit, I was surprised at how gorgeous this vinyl flooring is shared by Kelli from Lolly Jane.  That fabulous bench stole my heart as well!
 

Janice from Curtains in My Tree shared her latest finds of red transferware. One of my favorite things to collect.
 
 
Linda from A Labour of Life shared the how to's for these yummy peanut butter Oreo truffles.
 
 
Thanks so much for sharing and please grab my button if you were featured.
 

Hoping to have a new featured button for you soon!
 

Sunday, January 8, 2017

A Winter's Tea. . .

Well my friends, what do you do on a lazy Sunday afternoon?
 
It's cold outside and I want to do nothing more than hunker down on the couch and watch Edwardian Farm.
 
But, now and then I do get hungry, and thirsty.  :)
 
Why not have a winter's tea?
 
I've had this cute teapot for a few years.  I picked it up at our local grocers, Smith's Marketplace.
 
The small aqua cake stand is Pioneer Woman.  I got the speckled enamel tray at a damaged goods store last year.
 
 
The fun snowman plates were a thrift find and the dome goes with the PW cake stand.
 
 
I couldn't grab this sweet mug fast enough when I spied it at our local thrift.  As if the red polka dots weren't enough, it even had the letter 'J'!
 
 
This herbal tea is an infusion of hibiscus, cinnamon, and tropical fruits.  It was gifted to me by my neighbor and it is so yummy!  I picked up the cranberry scone mix at Home Goods a while ago.  They have some great food products!

 
I didn't notice until I was writing this post that the scones created the body of the snowman. lol!  Happy accident!
 
 
Nothing better than a warm scone!  I topped it with butter and homemade elderberry jelly.  A friend of my husbands gives him a bottle of something yummy every year.  He bottles it himself.
 
I finished watching Edwardian Farm while I sipped my tea and ate my scone.  Wished I had some coddled cream!
 


One for me,

 
and two for you!
 
 
Have you heard of the BBC documentary Edwardian Farm?  I read about it on Instagram. 
It's 12 episodes and the scenery is gorgeous!   I had to buy it on Amazon, and just finished watching it.  A bit sad to see it end.
 
This is the introduction to the first episode. 
 
Archaeologists Alex Langlands and Peter Ginn and historian Ruth attempt to bring Morwellham Quay in Devon back to life as it was in its Edwardian heyday. They begin with the basics, setting up home in one of the cottages, where the first task is unblocking the chimney so they can get the range working. They prepare for the arrival of their first livestock, and Ruth cooks a sheep's head stew. Alex builds a hay rick to store feed, while Peter heads to Bodmin moor to carve a stone feeding trough.
 
A few months ago I bought the book,
"The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady"
I love reading the entries and the photos are delightful!
 
This is my favorite January page.  I've created a little vignette with it and one of my birdhouses in our entertainment center.
 


This little birdhouse I bought in Napa one year on vacation matched the blue in the birds to a tee.
 


 
We certainly wouldn't see Blue Tit birds outside in January here in UT.  They do not have such harsh winters in Devon.
 
At the end of the 12 episode series; Ruth, the historian stated that it was delightful, but very hard being an Edwardian lady!
 
I would love to give it a try, how about you?
 
hugs,
Jann
 
I will be sharing with these fun parties:
 


 

Friday, January 6, 2017

A Hearty Winter's Meal. . .

Hello my friends,
have you ever heard of 'holuska'?
 
Unless you come from a Hungarian/Czecholavakian heritage the chances are pretty slim.  :)
 
Growing up my mom made holuska quite regularly.  (We're not even sure how you spell it)  It was an inexpensive dish that our dad had taught her.  He learned it from his parents.
 
It may not look delicious, but trust me. . .if you love cabbage, dumplings, and butter; you will love this!  Yes, butter, lots and lots of butter!!
 
 
First you peel potatoes and cut them into small pieces.  Put them in a blender and add a bit of water.  Just enough that the blender will chop them up.  I continue adding until I have a blender full.  That will make a lot of dumplings.
 
 
Soon they will look like this.

 
Then you take that potato mush and add flour.

 
Now you will have a potato paste.  lol!
Next you drop spoonfuls of potato paste into hot boiling water. Try not to let it stop boiling.
Now this is where it gets funny.  In my mind I always remembered  mom saying that they should not be any larger than the tip of your big finger.  None of my sisters remember this.  I think I must have dreamed it.  (wink)  Believe me from now on, I am making them bigger.  It took me forever to cook them all!
 
 
 At this point I am already dreaming of that buttery potato goodness!


 You continue cooking them until they float to the top and turn white.  Under cooked dumplings are not good!!
Mom use to take one out of the water and cut into it to see if it was cooked through.  Mine were so small that I didn't have to worry.


After you cook a batch put them in a strainer and rinse off all that extra starch.  Yes, I'm saving you a few calories so that you can add more butter.  ha, ha!

 
Fry up a head of cabbage and you're good to go.
 
 

Stir the two together, heat through and season with S&P, and (in unison say) lots of BUTTER.
 
YUM!
 

 
We had our Ohio relatives here for a reunion last July.  None of them had heard of holuska.  They did remember grandpa making some kind of potato/cabbage dish.
Our dad was the oldest surviving son, and maybe that's why he knew how to make it.
 
And a humorous fact about holuska is that you don't want to feed it to a basketball player just before a game.  Our brother, Dennis played basketball on the high school team.  He'd tell mom, "please don't make holuska before a game, because I can't jump after eating it".  Stories like this make this dish even more wonderful!
 
Do you have any heirloom recipes passed down from older generations?
 
hugs,
Jann